About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
the opportunity to diverse, talk about afghanistan, bahrain, syria, talk about this, that, and so the agenda has to be narrow as a need of focusing on the issue of the principle concern. that's one. that's con accept issue, as far as i can tell was never resolved. when an issue remains unresolved, the status quo revails. i suspect, given the fact the issue of a bilateral conversation is a last ditch effort, likely to remain focused. should it be considered a last ditch effort? i don't think so. you talk about years of decision, the year of that, the year of that. we have more time on this issue. it's a paradoxical one. think about it as not having the time, yet, there's always more time. you know, everybody, so this is in 2008, 2009, somehow this issue seems to have within its urgency a degree of time flexibility. i don't know how to explain that. we have had bilateral discussions before in october 2009, most collectly. if there's a bilateral one to take place, which tends to condition the agenda that's going to be discussed. >> marina, bringing you in on this, ray said we need a sense of modest
civil war in syria. the hearing on the military conflict in eastern congo. later, a discussion about the middle east security. >> president obama this evening said the u.s. now recognize the main syrian opposition groups as the legitimate representative of this country's people. earlier today political adviser to the syrian american council and a turkish journalist reporting on this serious civil war at the new america foundation. both men recently returned from the country and say the west can do more to help the syrian people. >> welcome, everyone. wellcome also to know c-span and its audience. very excited about today's events because we have two people with those who have recently come from syria and are able to give us an insider perspective, something that is hard to come by in the context of syria. to my far right is mohammed ghanem. he received his bachelor's degree in english literature as well as his graduate degree in translation from damascus university. he went on to aaron a master's degree in peace building in conflict transformation from the center of justice and peace
between instability and central africa and the global terrorist threat. but from afghanistan to syria to iran to north korea, we also must recognize the existence of demonstrate actors and regimes that directly threaten the united states and our allies. therefore, we must ensure that the our military is sufficiently resourced and national leaders prioritize our defense resources toward efforts that are appropriate for the u.s. military and our national vital security interest. i look forward to learning more about the situation on the ground as well as what the u.s. government is doing to address the situation in the drc. mr. smith? >> thank you, mr. chairman. i thank you very much for taking the time to hold the hearing. it's a very important issue, as you can described the situation in the eastern drc is dire. it's largest humanitarian crisis i think too few people have heard of. and some estimate of the war going over the course of the last fifteen to twenty years. and nearly 5 million people have been killed. many more wounded, injured, raped. it's a place are a lot of people are
at syria where u.s. is at risk, a serious conflict there with the chemical weapons, obviously, real concerns about iran as well. is the shift occurring before the job is done in the middle east? >> well, i would go back to the president's strategy on this, and take a look at it that didn't say we'd shift everything we have in the military or in the government into the asia pacific. it prioritized the asia pacific, but it talked about an enduring requirement to be in a present and security role in the middle east as well. you know, we're talking about, i think, a near term perspective on this, you know, we're -- we seed a glide slope in afghanistan. yes, the middle east is -- has issues that and has historically had issues that will require, i think, u.s., obviously, u.s. leadership, but also requires certain level of military security over time, and we will have to balance that as we look at the size and nature of our forestructure, and, you know, what we have, the assets we have to be able to accomplish it, but i'm convinced we can do both in the long run, and i'm convinced we're o
. another example is syria. al qaeda and iraq seeks to establish a long-term presence under the pseudonym. they fighting alongside armed syrian opposition groups from the members are working to hijack a long repressed nations struggle to suit their own extremist needs. last week redesignated an alias at aqa, which is already of course listed at foreign terrorist organizations. as they wrap themselves in legitimacy of the opposition, we called terrorists out of a warning to all who wish to support the opposition to the syrian people and not help a terrorist group put down roots. to add to this list of new challenges in west africa was a nice collection of mrs. booker rob continue to carry at attacks in nigeria from exporting agreements in northern nature as to when recruits and public sympathy. the number and sophistication is increasing and while the group focuses on nigerian issues that are scum at every port is developing financial with other extremists and rushes to operate on a bigger stage. at this point i need to make something of a detour because while nonstate actors such as al qa
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)